The rabbit as a producer of meat and skins in developing countries
 

J. E. Owen, D. J. Morgan and J. Barlow

April 1977 (reprinted October 1986), 31pp

Tropical Development and Research Institute
127 Clerkenwell Road London EC1 R 5DB

© Crown copyright 1977


Contents:
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS; Résumé et conclusions; Resumen y conclusiones
CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION
CHAPTER 2: THE PRESENT STATE OF RABBIT PRODUCTION IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES

CHAPTER 3: THE EFFECTS OF HIGH AMBIENT TEMPERATURES ON RABBIT PRODUCTION

  CHAPTER 4: MANAGEMENT OF RABBITS IN TROPICAL DEVELOPING COUNTRIES
  CHAPTER 5: RABBIT SLAUGHTER AND PROCESSING
  CHAPTER 6: RABBIT SKINS
  CHAPTER 7: POSSIBLE PROBLEMS CONCERNING ESCAPED STOCK
  REFERENCES

List of Illustrations

Figure 1 Rabbit production in Algeria illustrative of simple housing constructed from local materials, and forage based feeding
Figure 2 The National Rabbit Project at Kwabenya in Ghana. This illustrates the use of simply constructed housing from local materials
Figure 3 A large crossbred rabbit at the National Rabbit Project in Ghana
Figure 4 The publicity campaign for the Government sponsored National Rabbit Project in Ghana
Figure 5 A basket cage made of interwoven split bamboo at Bunda College, Malawi. The roll back lid is constructed from split bamboo and wire. The floors are constructed with the outer portion of the bamboo upwards, which reduces damage from gnawing and facilitates cleaning
Figure 6 Experimental rabbit housing at Bunda College, Malawi. The cage is of bamboo construction with walls and a part of the floor plastered with mud. Wire has been used for exposed ties to avoid damage by gnawing. The roof has been removed to give a clearer view of the interior.
Figure 7 Nesting box made from local clay at Bunda College, Malawi
Figure 8 Feeding and drinking bowls made from local clay at Bunda College, Malawi
Figure 9 Traditionally smoked and dried grasscutter (Thyronomys swinderianus) in Ghana
Figure 10 Traditionally prepared rabbit carcase smoked in a kiln for 12 hours: ventral view. (The fur would normally be burned or singed off)
Figure 11 Conventionally dressed rabbit carcase smoked in a kiln for 12 hours: ventral view (left) and dorsal view (right)


This report was produced by the Tropical Development and Research Institute (formed by the amalgamation of the Tropical Products Institute and the Centre for Overseas Pest Research) a British Government organisation, funded by the Overseas Development Administration, which provides technical assistance to developing countries. The Institute specialises in post-harvest problems and pest and vector management.

Short extracts of material from this report may be reproduced in any non-advertising, non-profit context provided that the source is acknowledged as follows:

Owen, J. E., Morgan, D. J. and Barlow, J. (1977) The rabbit as a producer of meat and skins in developing countries. Report of the Tropical Development and Research Institute, G 108, v + 31 pp.

Permission for commercial reproduction should, however, be sought from the Head, Publications, Publicity and Public Relations Section, Tropical Development and Research Institute, College House, Wright's Lane, London W8 5SJ, United Kingdom.

Price £2.10

No charge is made for single copies of this publication sent to governmental and educational establishments, research institutions and non-profit making organisations working in countries eligible for British Aid. Free copies cannot normally be addressed to individuals by name but only under their official titles.

Tropical Development and Research Institute
ISBN: 0 85954 062 6
ISSN : 0264 - 763X

Acknowledgements

The authors would like to thank the various personnel and organisations, who helped to provide some of the information presented. In particular they would like to thank J Flux of the Department of Scientific and Industrial Research, New Zealand, for his advice and discussion; N Mamattah, University of Ghana, J F Mcnitt and P E Makhambera, Bunda College, Malawi, and E Stamp, Oxfam UK, for photographic material.

 


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