home.cd3wd.ar.cn.de.en.es.fr.id.it.ph.po.ru.sw

Stop Press 2006/02 - download the complete Gidamis (0.8 megabytes) at http://www.cd3wd.com/Gidamis/Gidamis.zip

DETAIL AND SUMMARY ON 39000 INTERNATIONAL AID PROJECTS 1989 THRU 1995

374 Project Categories listed in descending Amount per Category Sequence

374 Project Categories listed in descending Average Amount per Project Sequence

374 Project Categories listed in descending Number of Projects per Category Sequence

374 Project Categories listed in Alphabetical Category Description Sequence

374 Project Categories listed in Category Code Sequence

374 Project Categories listed in Broad Category then descending Amount per Category Sequence

374 Project Categories listed in Broad Category then Alphabetical Category Description Sequence

Donors, Agencies and Recipients - 3 separate lists in Descending Total Amount Sequence

This small set of web pages (about 5 megabytes total, 390 pages - dont let that put you off staying) looks at the International Aid and Development Business mainly from a technical point of view - you are interested in pigs or silkworms, windpower or gender issues, debt relief or privatisation - you can home straight in on your area of interest, see what countries donated the projects, which countries received the projects, which agency managed the project, how much money was involved, which year the project started in. To go into more detail you will have to contact the donors and agencies involved with a request for information.

We could have done for these pages a lot of analysis showing which donors tend to work with which recipients, which donors tend to work in which sectors, which recipients tend to get projects in certain sectors, declining, stable and ascending sectors, donors and recipients etc etc., but there are other information sources which cover that kind of stuff, the information to which we had access is a bit out of date (only up till 1995), and there is a lot of routine info for every bit of interesting stuff - therefore this exposition is deliberately limited.

Maybe also OECD might look at these pages and get some ideas on how to present in a more useable fashion the info which they diligently collect - of course sometimes the data organisers prefer that information is difficult to access and boring to view - it gives them less trouble.

Alex Weir, 2 Pepper Close, Hatfield, Harare, Zimbabwe, Africa December 1999

Alexweir@hotmail.com