Home-immediately access 800+ free online publications. Download CD3WD (680 Megabytes) and distribute it to the 3rd World. CD3WD is a 3rd World Development private-sector initiative, mastered by Software Developer Alex Weir and hosted by GNUveau_Networks (From globally distributed organizations, to supercomputers, to a small home server, if it's Linux, we know it.)ar.cn.de.en.es.fr.id.it.ph.po.ru.sw

CLOSE THIS BOOKCARE Food Manual (CARE , 1998, 355 p.)
VIEW THE DOCUMENT(introduction...)
VIEW THE DOCUMENTAcknowledgements
VIEW THE DOCUMENTIntroduction
Chapter 1 - Programming Food Resources
Chapter 2 - Assessments Cost and Logistics
Chapter 3 - Internal Control
Chapter 4 - Agreements and Contracts
Chapter 5 - Call Forward and Procurement
Chapter 6 - Port
Chapter 7 - Storage and Handling
Chapter 8 - Food receipt and dispatch
Chapter 9 - Loses and Claims
Chapter 10 - Inventory Accounting and Reporting
Chapter 11 - Food Distribution To Sites
Chapter 12 - Monitoring Project Sites
VIEW THE DOCUMENTAcronyms
VIEW THE DOCUMENTBibliography
VIEW THE DOCUMENTAttachments

Attachments

PERIODIC EXPENSES

Units

PVO

AID/Host Gov.

NGO Counterpart

TRAINING

Avg.1




Seminars2





Training Food Distributors





Outside-schooling





Other/specifiy





Total TRAINING:


0








CAPITAL GOODS EXPENSES

Units

PVO

AID/Host Gov.

NGO Counterpart

CAPITAL3

SHARE4




Trucks





Cars





Computers





Software





Typewriters





Equipment





Furniture





Office Buildings Constructed





Warehouses Constructed





Pallets





Distribution Center Utensils, Measuring
Devices, Cups...





Education Materials





Other/specify





Total CAPITAL


0

1 If training costs are bunched together just once every couple of years, the try to divide them across that number of years so that each year has a representative average.

2 Include the fees of outside consultants.

3 Capital refers to long-term purchases. Again, the goal is to estimate the average expense per year. Therefore, if possible, divide the purchase of the capital item (using its current dollar price) by the number of years of its anticipated lifetime of use. Alternately, it is reasonable to estimate the yearly cost of the item by simply finding out the current rental price for the item on the local market.

4 Again, note the share of the items importance to the food-specific activities of the program. Use this fraction when estimating the relevant expenditure for items shared between projects.

RECURRING COSTS

Units

PVO

AID/Host Gov.16

NGO Counterpart

PORT CLEARING & TRANSPORT

RATE:




Port Fees, Taxes





Clearing Fees





Port Storage





Rail Fees





Barge, Waterway





Truck Contract6





Fuel7





Fleet Insurance





Fleet Parts





Other/specifiy





Total PORT/TRANSPORT:


0

5 Ignore A.I.D.-arranged transport overland up to landlocked countries. A.I.D. may directly contract the port surveyor or negotiate clearing fees. Include these expenses as best you can. In several countries the Host Government provides rail transport. Estimate its value in terms of the expenses this spares you.

6 Often private transporters are contracted for large-scale transport. This expense subsumes their attendant fuel, insurance costs, etc.

7 Even where the PVO contracts out for much transport, three are still local, pickup truck scale costs. These should be included here.

RECURRING COSTS

Units

PVO

AID/Host Gov.

NGO Counterpart8

RENT, UTILITIES

SHARE9




Central Office Rent





Local Office Rent





Postage





Telex, E-Mail





Printing





Telephone





Central Warehouse Rent10





Local Warehouse Rent11





Stationary, Ledgers





Bagging Materials





Fumigation





Distribution Centers Rent





Forms/Waybills





Utilities





Maintenance





Repair (Warehouses & Offices)





Other/specify





Total RENT/UTILITIES:


0

8 Indigenous organizations with whom you work should be included if they are part of the food distribution network. Try to include their day-to-day incidental costs.

9 This is extremely important. Most of the recurring costs support both food and non-food activities. It is important at least to estimate what share of expenses are related exclusively to the food distribution effort. In this column note what portion (.3? .5? .75?) of the annual expenses should be attributed to the food activities but not to complementary activities or other NGO projects unrelated to food.

10 Do not double count expenses already recorded under port storage.

11 Note the number of warehouses.

STAFF EXPENSES

Units

PVO

AID/Host Gov.

NGO Counterpart

FRINGES & BENEFITS

/Yr.12




Severance





Pensions





Housing





Allowances





Insurance





Other Benefits





Other/specify:





(Benfits summed)





Total SALARIES & FRINGE:13


0

TRAVEL14





Internal Trips (air)





Internal Trips (land)15





Fuel





Vehicle Insurance





Parts/Lubricants





Maintenance Labor





Per Diems





Other/specify





Total TRAVEL


0

Warehouses Constructed





Pallets





Distribution Center Utensils, Measuring
Devices, Cups...





Education Materials





Other/specify





Total CAPITAL:





12 Remember that the values recorded in this section as well as the others are for annual tools, not monthly outlays. It is probably not useful to record anything in this (units) column.

13 Add the totals here to the salaries totals on the previous page.

14 This section relates solely to the travel of personnel and equipment; commodity transport is recorded in another section. Include travel expenses of full-time staff as well as HQ visitors, monitors, consultants, etc.

15 Includes fees, bus fares, boat rentals, etc.

STAFF EXPENSES

Units

PVO

AID/Host Gov.16

NGO Counterpart8

SALARIES

FTE17




Country Director18





Project Manager





Commodities Manager





Commodities Officers





Transport Officers





Port Officer/Surveyor





Central Warehouse Rent10





Secretaries19





Accountant





Bookkeeper





Auditors20





Distribution Staff21





Warehouse Managers22





Guards





Office Drivers





Food Truck Drivers





Vehicle Maintenance





Casual Labor





Other/specify





(Column Sums)-



0

0






Warehouses Constructed





Pallets





Distribution Center Utensils, Measuring Devices, Cups...





Education Materials





Other/specify





Total CAPITAL





16 This column should record contributions either in cash or in-kind by either the U.S. Government (e.g. AID, CCC) or by the host government. For in-kind contributions, please make the best possible estimate of the dollar value.

17 Please note the number of full-time equivalents working in each category. This, multiplied by the mean salaries, gives the total expense. Record the sum of the portions of full-time staff devoted specifically to making the food program function, not for complementary activities.

18 For example, if there is one Country Director who spends 40% of his/her time administering the food programs, then the total FTE is .4.

19 If, for instance, there are 2 secretaries who work full-time on food programs, plus another 10 who work half-time on food programs, then the FTE is 7.0.

20 This may include full-time field monitors, or occasional preofessional auditors.

21 Remember that the goal is to capture the efforts of all persons working on the food program. This includes counterpart staff and the FTEs of professionals who spend part-time monitoring distributions.

22 Remember to include staff at each warehouse, both central and at the feeding sites.

Attachment taken from Food Aid Management, Food Aid Briefing, Preparation of MYOP, Washington, D.C. , November 1993

Exh E-2 HB 9

(TM 9:6) PAGE OF

TITLE II, PL 480 COMMODITIESANNUAL ESTIMATE OF REQUIREMENTS — FY(See reverse for instructions)

FORM APPROVED O.M.B. NO. 24-R0051

1. COUNTRY















2. COOPERATING SPONSOR



3. RECIPIENT CATEGORIES

3a.
NUMBER FEEDING DAYS
PER MO.

4.
NUMBER OF
RECIPIENTS

5.
NUMBER
MONTHS
OPERATING

5a.
NUMBER
DISTRIBUTED
PER YEAR

6 PROPOSED DISTRIBUTION








a.



a.



a.



a.








b. NUMBER
RECIPIENTS

c. RATE
KGS

d. METRICTONS

b. NUMBER
RECIPIENTS

c. RATE
KGS

d. METRICTONS

b. NUMBER
RECIPIENTS

c. RATEKGS

d. METRICTONS

b. NUMBER
RECIPIENTS

c. RATE
KGS

d. METRICTONS

Maternal Child Health-Mother

30
















Maternal Child Health-Child

30
















Preschool Child Feeding

25
















Other Child Feeding

30
















Other Child Feeding

25
















School Feeding

20
















Food for Work-Workers

30
















Food for Work-Dependents

30
















Other


































7. TOTAL RECIPIENTS


0



0



0



0



0



8. TOTAL REQUIREMENTS FOR FY







0



0



0



0

ADJUSTED REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENT (METRIC TONS)













9. Quantity on Hand September 30





10. Quantity Received October 1 through February 28

0

0

0

0

10a. From Prior Year Approval





10b. From Current Year Approval





11. Quantity on Hand February 28





12. Quantity Due or Received for Current FY Program After February 19





13. Total Line 11 Plus Line 12

0

0

0

0

14. Projected Distribution March 1 through September 30





15. Estimated Inventory, September 30

0

0

0

0

16. Desired Operating Reserve





17. Adjusted Total Requirements FY

0

0

0

0

CLEARANCES

SIGNATURE

TITLE

DATE

18. Submitted by (Field Representative)




19. Reviewed and Recommended by US AID or Embassy:




20. Cooperating Sponsor Approval




21. ISC/AID - Washington Approval




AID 1550-3 (1-77)

Project Design &
Evaluation

Procurement

Shipping

Internal transport,
Storage & Handling

Distribution &
Consumption

Project Design: Weighing Procurement and Shipping Factors in the Planning Process

When designing a project, many United States Private Voluntary Organizations (PVOs) tend to focus on the end uses of food aid. One way to make better use of food aid resources is to ensure that procurement and shipping factors are also taken into consideration during program design. These factors include timing of commodity purchase, packaging, freight rates and cargo size.

Timing of commodity purchase

Commodity prices fluctuate based on tuning of the next harvest, existing stock levels, packaging and on commodity specifications. Because the U.S. Department of Agriculture is solely responsible for the purchase of commodities, PVOs are often unaware of these price factors. Procurement during times when a commodity is low in stock or high in demand tend to be more costly.

The precise details of commodity specifications should be reviewed annually and adjusted, if necessary. Prices to guarantee an extra percent of protein for some U.S. staples may for instance rise by several dollars per ton from one year to the next.

Packaging

To minimize cost, commodities should be packed and shipped in the largest possible packages. Smaller packages require more time and materials to supply a given commodity and more time and stevedoring labor to load and unload the vessel. In addition, smaller packages are more subject to pilferage.

If a commodity is to be shipped in containers, project planners should consider how many packages of a given commodity can fit in one 20' or 40' container based on the cubic dimensions and weight of the product. Both cost and damage can be minimized when only full containers are shipped.

Freight rates

Freight rates, like commodity prices, arc also governed by the laws of supply and demand. The number of US flag vessels regularly engaged in food aid transportation is very limited, probably employing 60 vessels or less on average. These vessels are heavily booked during August, September and October because freight must be contracted before the end of a particular fiscal/programming year. Although it may not always be convenient on the receiving end, being able to ship during 'off months such as January and February may often result in significant cost savings, and also meet cargo preference requirements, by making me of US flag vessels that would otherwise not be employed during these months

Cargo Size

Freight rates are lowest when the cargo size matches the loading capacity of the vessel. PVOs will incur nearly the same fixed voyage costs whether or not the vessel is fully loaded. Subsequently, for full vessel loads, these fixed costs are spread over a larger tonnage base, thus decreasing the freight rate per ton.

FY 1996 Title II Procurement Schedule

Calls Forward
Due in FFP/POD
NOT LATER THAN

Invitation
Number

Purchase
Month

U.S. At Port
Dates

Overseas
Arrival

Jul 3, 1995

085

August

10/05-10/20

10/25-11/20

Aug 4, 1995

095

September

11/05-11/20

11/25-12/20

Sep 1, 1995

105

October

12/05-12/20

12/25-01/20

Oct 4, 1995

115

November

01/05-01/20

01/25-02/20

Nov 3, 1995

125

December

02/05-02/20

02/25-03/20

Dec 4, 1995

016

January

03/05-03/20

03/25-04/20

Jan 4, 1996

026

February

04/05-04/20

04/25-05/20

Feb 2, 1996

036

March

05/05-05/20

05/25-06/20

Mar 4, 1996

046

April

06/05-06/20

06/25-07/20

Apr 4, 1996

056

May

07/05-07/20

07/25-08/20

May 3, 1996

066

June

08/05-08/20

08/25-09/20

Jun 4, 1996*

076

July

09/05-09/20

09/25-10/20

* Last FY 1996 Processed Commodity Purcase


Figure


Figure


Figure


Figure


Figure


Figure


Figure


Figure


Figure


Figure


Figure


Figure


Figure


Figure


Figure


Figure


Figure


Figure


Figure


Figure


Figure


Figure


Figure


Figure


Figure


Figure


Figure


Figure


Figure


Figure


Figure


Figure


Figure


Figure

Verification list for cleaning the warehouse

Name of the warehouse _____________________________________________________

Location _________________________________________________________________

A. Use of warehouse




1. Product stored




2. Storage space





a. Capacity __________________________________________________________



b. Area _____________________________________________________________

B. Conditions outside the warehouse

Yes

No

1. Loading and unloading area

____

____



a. Accumulations of grain or chaff?

____

____



b. Accumulations of garbage?

____

____


2. Presence of grass or tall weeds?

____

____


3. Piles of garbage or junk?

____

____


4. Evidence of rodents (burrows, etc.)?

____

____


5. Birds perching or nesting under the roof?

____

____

C. Maintaining the exterior of the warehouse




1. Does the roof need repair?

____

____


2. Holes in the walls where birds may enter?

____

____


3. After closing the doors, are there still holes where rodents may enter?

____

____


4. Vents without screens?

____

____


5. Vents with damaged screens?

____

____

D. Maintenance of the warehouse

____

____


1. Need to clean the floors?

____

____


2. Accumulations of garbage, equipment or junk in the warehouse?

____

____


3. Need to clean the walls or the inside of the roof?

____

____


4. Is there rodent bait or pieces of glass on the ground?

____

____

E. Grain storage prcatices




1. Is grain stored against the wall?

____

____


2. Is grain stacked on the floor?

____

____


3. Are the stacks of grain separated from each other by at least one meter?

____

____


4. Is the grain stored close to the chemicals, pesticides, or strong smelling materials?

____

____


5. Are there broken bags of grain in stacks?

____

____

F. Insect infestations




1. Are insects flying inside the warehouse?

____

____


2. Insects or worms





a. On the floor?

____

____



b. On the outside of the bags?

____

____



c. Inside the grain bags?

____

____


3. Traces of insects evident in the dust?

____

____

G. Conditions suggesting rodents or birds




1. Rat excrement visible on the floor or on top of sacks?

____

____


2. Do the stacks have bags chewed by rodents?

____

____


3. Are rodents visible in the warehouse?

____

____


4. Traces of rodents in the dust?

____

____


5. Bird excrement on the floor or on bags?

____

____


6. Birds seen in the warehouse?

____

____

H. Grain handling practices




1. Has all grain been inspected when arriving at warehouse?

____

____


2. Can the warehouse personnel identify the insects that infest the grain?

____

____


3. Is grain fumigated when insects are found?

____

____


4. Is grain fumigated when it arrives at the warehouse?

____

____


5. Do workers report every evidence of rodents, insects or birds?

____

____

I. Control of infestation




1. Is rat poison in use?

____

____



a. On the outside of the warehouse

____

____



b. On the inside of the warehouse

____

____


2. Are the stations for bait adequately maintained?

____

____


If no, why not?_____________________________________________________




3. What rat poisons are used in the warehouse?




4. Do the traps used in the warehouse have bait?

____

____


Are they set?

____

____


5. Are residual insecticides used in the warehouse?

____

____


What residual insecticides were used?




6. Are fog or spray insecticides used in the warehouse?

____

____


Which insecticide was used as fog or spray?____________________________




7. Are fumigants used in the warehouse?

____

____


Which fumigants were used?_________________________________________




8. Are records maintained of rodent control?

____

____


9. Are records maintained of insect control?

____

____

J. Warehouse administration




1. Does the warehouse director make a preiodic inspection of the warehouse?

____

____

Warehouse foreman ______________________________________________________
Quality control agent _________________________________- Date________________

CARE
151 Ellis Street NE
Atlanta, GA 30303-2439
Tel 404 681-2552
Fax

404 577-6662
404 577-1205

ALMIS

#4351

Date:

October 10, 1994

To:

Senior Staff Regional Foundation Offices Country Offices

From:

Bill Novelli

Subject:

Policy on losses and Fraudulent Acts

CARE's reputation is its most valuable asset. We must all work to maintain the highest degree of accountability to our donors, and avoid or prevent situations which may compromise our position. Below is CARE's policy on losses and fraudulent acts. Please review and discuss it with all of your stff, post it in a central location, and take appropriate action if necessary. We will be forwarding translated copies as soon as they are available.

Management is resonsible for detecting defalcations, misappropriations, and other irregularities, and for having a system of internal control in place to reduce the risk of loss. This includes situations that occur due to the Country Director or Department Head's negligence in monitoring his/her staff, not having adequate systems to prevent losses or at a minimum detect them on a timely basis, not implementing the recommendations made as a result of audits (internal or external), and not adequately safeguarding CARE property (building, cars, etc.). In addition, each member of CARE's management team should be familiar with the types of improprieties that might occur within his/her area of responsibility and be alert for any indication of irregularity.

The terms defalcation, misappropriation, and other fiscal irregularities refer to, but are not limited to:

Any dishonest or fraudulent act;

Forgery or alteration of any document or account belonging to CARE (including, but not limited to time sheets, payroll and associated leave records and accounts, procurement documents, agricultural commodity records, spare parts or project materials and equipment inventory records, food commodity management and monitoring reports, etc.);

Forgery or alteration of a check, bank draft, or any other financial document;

Misappropriation of funds, commodities, securities, supplies, spare parts, project materials and equipment, or other assets;

Impropriety in the handling or reporting of money, financial transactions, or bidding procedures;

Accepting or seeking anything of material value from vendors or persons providing services/materials to CARE (exceptions: perishable gifts intended for a group of employees, such as candy or flowers);

Destruction or misappropriation of records, furniture, fixtures, or equipment;

Diversion, alteration, or mismanagement of documents or information; and/or

Any similar or related irregularity.

Any employee who identifies or suspects an irregularity has an obligation to report this to his/her immediate supervisor. If the employee is not satisfied after discussions, or has reason to believe that the supervisor is involved, he/she should speak with the manager at the next level.

Once the detected or suspected irregularity has been identified, management (domestic: Division or Department Head and overseas: the Country Director) must immediately report the incident to Trish Shannon, Director of Internal Audit, who coordinates all investigations with General Counsel and other affected areas, both internal and external. Country Directors should notify the Regional Manager at the time Internal Audit is notified.

If an employee suspects dishonest or fraudulent activity, he/she should report such activity through the normal chain of supervision. However, if this is not possible, Trish is available to discuss such matters on a confidential basis.

This policy applies to any irregularity, or suspected irregularity, involving not only employees, but also vendors and other outside parties. Investigations will be conducted without regard to length of service, position, title, or relationship.

Please confirm to Trish Shannon, no later than November 15, 1994, that you and your staff have read this ALMIS.

If there is any question as to whether an action constitutes fraud, or if you have any questions about this policy, please contact Trish Shannon for guidance.

Thank you.

CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY FEES PAID

I hereby certify that CARE, Inc. has incurred and paid $142.00 in marine Survey fees for the attached Survey Report in connection with the discharge of 2,268 cartons of Vegetable Oil loaded on board the SS/MV FALCON V-133

_________________________

OFFICIAL INVENTORY Name and Title

Tegucigalpa, M.D.C., July, 1995

brl./mrm

CODES FOR COMMODITY TYPE, LOSS LOCATION, AND LOSS TYPE

COMMODITY CODES

LOSS TYPE CODES

005 - Bulgur

BAG FAILURE WITH SPILLAGE

007 - Corn

(Contents not contaminated, deteriorated, or infested)

009 - Cornmeal

101 - Mechanically ripped, torn, cut or punctured

011 - CSB (Corn-Soy Blend)

102 - Burst

012 - CSB, Instant

103 - Loosened adhesive when bag is water damaged

013 - CSM, Instant

104 - Punctured by insects

014 - CSM (Corn-Soy-Milk)

105 - Other bag damage problems

015 - Grain Sorghum


018 - Non-fat Dried Milk


019 - Rolled Oats


021 - Rice, Milled


023 - Soy Foritifed Bulghur


025 - Soy Fortified Cornmeal


027 - Soy Fortified Flour 6%

DEFECTIVE BAGS

029 - Soy Fortified Flour 12%

110 - Leaking longitudinal or side seam

031 - Soy Fortified Rolled Oats

111 - Leaking closure, bottom

032 - Soy Fortified Sorghum Grits

112 - Leaking closure, top

033 - Full Fat Soy Flour

113 - Corners peeling

035 - Defatted Soy Flour

114 - Wrinkled along fold, bottom

039 - Vegoil, Soybean Salad

115 - Wrinkled along fold, top

040 - Vegoil, Peanut

116 - Tapered closure

041 - Wheat

117 - Loosened adhesive when bag is not water damaged

043 - Wheat Flour


045 - Wheat Rolled


046 - Whey Soy Drink Mix


047 - WSB (Wheat-Soy Blend)


LOSS LOCATION CODES

EXPOSED STITCHING

1 - Lost during ocean transport

118 - Tape improperly positioned, top

2 - Lost during in-country transport

119 - Tape wrinkled, top

3 - Lost in customs warehouse

120 - Tape not adhering, top

4 - Lost in agency warehouse

121 - Tape improperly positioned, bottom

5 - Other

122 - Tape wrinkled, bottom


123 - Tape not adhering, bottom


124 - Other defect or stitching problem

MOLDY BAGS

INFESTED WITH INSECTS

201 - Combined with spilled commodity

601 - Infested and bag failure

202 - Spilled commodity absent

623 (Note: Use suffixes 01 - 23 from 100 series, i.e. Infested and Burst = 600 + 02 = 602)

SHORT WEIGHT BAGS

625 - Undamaged and opened bags

301 - Quantity received less than specified weight (Note: include number of bags affected on back)

626 - Undamaged and unopened bags

CONTAMINATED but NOT INFESTED

627 - Patched, taped, over-slipped, or rebagged commodity

401 - Soiled by rodents, birds, or animals

INFERIOR GRADE

402 - Mixed with water

701 - Excess dockage

403 - Mixed with chemicals, pesticides, petroleum products, etc.

702 - Excess broken kernels

404 - Contains rope spores in original bag

703 - Excess other grain or leguminous seeds

405 - Contains noxious seeds (original bag or bulk grains)

704 - Other problems affecting grade

406 - Other contamination problem

OTHER UNSPECIFIED REASON FOR LOSSES


801 - Specify reason __________

DETERIORATED but NOT INFESTED or CONTAMINATED


(Commodity is discolored and/or tastes or smells unclean, stale or musty)


501 - Deteriorated and bag failure


523 (Note: Use suffixes 01 - 23 from 100 series, i.e. Deteriorated and Corners Peeling = 500 + 13 = 513)


525 - Undamaged and opened bags


526 - Undamaged and unopened bags


527 - Patched, taped, over-slipped, or rebagged commodity


CARE
151 Ellis Street NE
Atlanta, GA 30303-2439
Tel 404 681-2552
Fax

404 577-6662
404 577-1205

Date:

July 27, 1995

To:

Ms. Sally Nunn Commodity Credit Corporation USDA-ASCS

Subject:

Reimbursement of Reconstitution Expenses India #2507 P for Rs. 89,133.40 or USD 2,822.46

Dear Ms. Nunn:

Enclosed please find documents supporting the above referenced request for reimbursement of reconstitution cost in accordance with AID Regulation 11, Section 211.7 (e) (iii).

Please make check payable to CARE and forward to my attention.

Sincerely,

Imelda C. Zumbro
Logistics/Transportation & PL480 Officer

cc: CARE-India

CARE
151 Ellis Street NE
Atlanta, GA 30303-2439
Tel 404 681-2552
Fax

404 577-6662
404 577-1205

Date:

July 12, 1995

To:

Imelda Zumbro CARE USA

From:

P.R. Chauhan CARE India

Subject:

Reimbursement of reconstitution expenses incurred on reconstitution of damages that took place after discharge of cargo by Ocean Carrier at Visakhapatnam Port Rs. 89,133.40 or $2,822.46

Dear Imelda:

According to AID Regulation 11 Section 211.7 (f) (iii) the Volag is permitted to claim reimbursement of the expenses incurred on reconstitution of damages that have taken place after discharge of the cargo by Ocean Carrier. Attached is a statement giving details of Reconstitution expenses by shipments together with photocopies of the supporting invoices in duplicate.

Please retain one set and forward one set to CCC with a request for reimbursement to CARE India in U.S. Dollars.

Please acknowledge receipt.

Thank you.

Warm regards,

P.R. Chauhan

Encls: a.a.


Figure


Figure


Figure

CARE CERTIFICATE OF DESTRUCTION

Location (name or #): ________________________

Date: ____________________________

Shipment #: _______________________________

Commodity Type: __________________

Loss and Adjustment Report #: _______________

Unit (bag/carton/drum): _____________

Date of Authorization to Destroy: ______________

Unit Weight: ______________________

Donor: ___________________________________

Contract ID #: _____________________

Commodity: _________________________
Place of Destruction:________________________________________
Date of Destruction:_________________________________________
Method of Destruction: ______________________________________

The unfit commodity has been destroyed in such a manner as to prevent its return for animal or human consumption.

CARE Employee Supervising Destruction:

Signature: __________________________

Designation: _________________

Govt. Representative Assisting Destruction


Signature: __________________________

Designation: _________________

Independent Witness to Destruction


Signature: __________________________

Designation: _________________

CARE program Incharge's


Signature: __________________________

Designation: _________________

*Certificate should be attached to Loss and Adjustment Report.

Original
Commodity Accountant
Finance Section

Copy 1
Food and Logistics
Section

Copy 2
Preparer of
Certificate


Figure


Figure


Figure


Figure


Figure


Figure


Figure


Figure


Figure


Figure


Figure


Figure


Figure

TO PREVIOUS SECTION OF BOOK