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CLOSE THIS BOOKElectrical Installation - Basic vocational knowledge (Institut fr Berufliche Entwicklung, 201 p.)
VIEW THE DOCUMENT(introduction...)
VIEW THE DOCUMENTIntroduction
1. Protective measures against too high a contact voltage and conduct following electrical accidents
VIEW THE DOCUMENT1.1. Earthing of electrical systems
VIEW THE DOCUMENT1.2. Marking of conductors and designation of networks
1.3. Protective conductors
VIEW THE DOCUMENT(introduction...)
VIEW THE DOCUMENT1.3.1. Designation of protective conductors
VIEW THE DOCUMENT1.3.2. Minimum cross sections of protective conductors
VIEW THE DOCUMENT1.3.3. Connection of protective conductors
VIEW THE DOCUMENT1.3.4. Lines for potential equalization
1.4. Mode of action, conditions and application of protective measures against too high a contact voltage
VIEW THE DOCUMENT(introduction...)
VIEW THE DOCUMENT1.4.1. Protective insulation
VIEW THE DOCUMENT1.4.2. Protective low voltage
VIEW THE DOCUMENT1.4.3. Protective isolation
VIEW THE DOCUMENT1.4.4. The protective conductor system
VIEW THE DOCUMENT1.4.5. Protective earthing
VIEW THE DOCUMENT1.4.6. Neutralization
VIEW THE DOCUMENT1.4.7. Current-operated earth-leakage protection
VIEW THE DOCUMENT1.4.8. Voltage-operated earth-leakage protection
VIEW THE DOCUMENT1.4.9. The isolating current-operated earth-leakage protection
VIEW THE DOCUMENT1.5. Conduct after electrical accidents
VIEW THE DOCUMENT1.6. Summary
2. Power overhead-line systems
VIEW THE DOCUMENT(introduction...)
VIEW THE DOCUMENT2.1. Conductor materials and minimum cross sections
VIEW THE DOCUMENT2.2. Supports points for overhead lines
VIEW THE DOCUMENT2.3. Protection against contact in overhead lines
VIEW THE DOCUMENT2.4. Erection of poles
VIEW THE DOCUMENT2.5. Stringing the conductors
VIEW THE DOCUMENT2.6. Mounting conductor joints
VIEW THE DOCUMENT2.7. Mounting the stranded conductors to the insulators
VIEW THE DOCUMENT2.8. Making service taps
VIEW THE DOCUMENT2.9. Work at existing overhead lines
VIEW THE DOCUMENT2.10. Summary
3. Laying of underground cables
VIEW THE DOCUMENT(introduction...)
VIEW THE DOCUMENT3.1. Preparing cable laying
VIEW THE DOCUMENT3.2. Underground laying of power cables
VIEW THE DOCUMENT3.3. Removal of insulation layers from cable
VIEW THE DOCUMENT3.4. Cable joints and terminations
VIEW THE DOCUMENT3.5. Making of conductor connections
VIEW THE DOCUMENT3.6. Testing of cables
VIEW THE DOCUMENT3.7. Summary
4. Low-voltage switchgear and distribution systems
VIEW THE DOCUMENT(introduction...)
4.1. Low-voltage distribution systems
VIEW THE DOCUMENT(introduction...)
VIEW THE DOCUMENT4.1.1. Open-type switchgear
VIEW THE DOCUMENT4.1.2. Enclosed switchgear (factory-finished switchgear)
VIEW THE DOCUMENT4.1.3. Encapsulated switchgear
VIEW THE DOCUMENT4.1.4. Installation distributions
VIEW THE DOCUMENT4.2. Cable connections to switch and distribution systems
VIEW THE DOCUMENT4.3. Preparation and installation of bus bars
VIEW THE DOCUMENT4.4. Conduct during working with switchgear
VIEW THE DOCUMENT4.5. Summary
5. Fundamentals of installation engineering
VIEW THE DOCUMENT(introduction...)
VIEW THE DOCUMENT5.1. Fixing and marking the conduction paths
VIEW THE DOCUMENT5.2. Dimensioning of conductor cross sections
VIEW THE DOCUMENT5.3. Installation of lines
VIEW THE DOCUMENT5.4. Preparing lines for fixed installation
5.5. Connection of lighting fittings
VIEW THE DOCUMENT(introduction...)
VIEW THE DOCUMENT5.5.1. Incandescent lamps
VIEW THE DOCUMENT5.5.2. Discharge lamps
VIEW THE DOCUMENT5.5.3. Switching-on process of fluorescent lamps
VIEW THE DOCUMENT5.5.4. Operation of discharge lamps
5.6. Preparing lines for portable electrical equipment
VIEW THE DOCUMENT(introduction...)
VIEW THE DOCUMENT5.6.1. Removal of insulation layers
VIEW THE DOCUMENT5.6.2. Tinning conductors and bending terminal lugs
VIEW THE DOCUMENT5.6.3. Soldering on cable terminals
VIEW THE DOCUMENT5.6.4. Conductors’ terminal sleeves and contact lugs
VIEW THE DOCUMENT5.6.5. Stamping on cable terminals
VIEW THE DOCUMENT5.6.6. Connecting portable electrical equipment
5.7. Preparing tubes
VIEW THE DOCUMENT(introduction...)
VIEW THE DOCUMENT5.7.1. Preparation of plastic tubes
VIEW THE DOCUMENT5.7.2. Preparing steel tubes
VIEW THE DOCUMENT5.8. Installing showers and bathrooms
VIEW THE DOCUMENT5.9. Installation in explosion-prone rooms
VIEW THE DOCUMENT5.10. Principles for connecting power-consumer’s installations to the mains
VIEW THE DOCUMENT5.11. Summary
6. Installation of emergency lighting systems
VIEW THE DOCUMENT(introduction...)
VIEW THE DOCUMENT6.1. Demands on construction of emergency lighting systems
VIEW THE DOCUMENT6.2. Arrangement of distributions, circuits, cables and wires in emergency lighting systems
VIEW THE DOCUMENT6.3. Installation of emergency lighting systems
VIEW THE DOCUMENT6.4. Summary
7. Mounting and connection of motors
VIEW THE DOCUMENT7.1. Placement of electric motors
VIEW THE DOCUMENT7.2. Connection of three-phase motors
VIEW THE DOCUMENT7.3. Installation of motor protection switches
VIEW THE DOCUMENT7.4. Star-delta start of three-phase motors
VIEW THE DOCUMENT7.5. Summary
8. Testing of installed plants
VIEW THE DOCUMENT(introduction...)
VIEW THE DOCUMENT8.1. Visual inspection
VIEW THE DOCUMENT8.2. Testing the insulation resistance
VIEW THE DOCUMENT8.3. Functional testing
VIEW THE DOCUMENT8.4. Summary
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