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CLOSE THIS BOOKFibre and Micro-Concrete Roofing Tiles - Production Process and Tile-Laying Techniques (ILO, 1992, 172 p.)
VIEW THE DOCUMENT(introduction...)
VIEW THE DOCUMENTFOREWORD
VIEW THE DOCUMENTACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION
CHAPTER II RAW MATERIALS AND MORTAR
CHAPTER III EQUIPMENT
CHAPTER IV PRODUCTION PROCESS
CHAPTER V QUALITY CONTROL
CHAPTER VI ORGANIZATION OF PRODUCTION
CHAPTER VII ROOF STRUCTURE
CHAPTER VIII LAYING THE TILES
CHAPTER IX FEASIBILITY STUDY
CHAPTER X SOCIO-ECONOMIC CONSIDERATIONS
ANNEXES
VIEW THE DOCUMENTOther ILO publications
VIEW THE DOCUMENTBack Cover

Other ILO publications

Safety and health In construction. An ILO code of practice

Changes in working practices and conditions in the construction industry over the past decade have meant that competent authorities, health and safety committees, management or employers' and workers' organisations, in particular, should take a fresh look at such aspects as the safety of workplaces, health hazards, and construction equipment and machinery. This code of practice takes account of new areas in the sector which require improved health and safety practices and other protective measures.

ISBN 92-2-107104-9

20 Swiss francs

Training contractors for results, by Tor Hernes. A guide for trainers and training managers. Edited by Derek Miles Construction is a precarious and demanding industry, relying on the successful deployment of a multitude of disparate materials and skills. It is therefore hard to manage, and the performance of contractors who run small and medium-scale enterprises, especially in developing countries, is frequently criticised. At the same time, there is a growing appreciation that the industry offers scope for dramatic improvement. Training programmes alone will not achieve this, but they can make an important contribution, provided that they are well designed and well delivered.

This guide gives practical advice on preparing and running a successful training programme for building contractors. It is the outcome of a new and remarkably effective approach pioneered by the ILO: Interactive Contractor Training (ICT). In ICT sessions participants are encouraged to focus on the results of learning, measurable in terms of improved performance in quality, time and cost on the construction site.

For Hernes developed the Interactive Contractor Training methodology during a four-year ILO assignment, and is now an independent consultant in the field of construction management training.

Derek Miles is Director of Construction Management Programmes in the Management Development Branch of the ILO. "This is a particularly worthwhile acquisition for trainers and policy-makers alike. It is not the type of book that, once bought, remains untouched on the shelf." (New Zealand Journal of Industrial Relations, University of Otago, Dunedin)

ISBN 92-2-106253-8

20 Swiss francs

Technology Series

The object of the technical memoranda in this series is to help to disseminate, among small-scale producers, extension officers and project evaluators, information on small-scale processing technologies that are appropriate to the socio-economic conditions of developing countries.

ISSN 0252-2004

Small-scale brickmaking. Technology Series, Technical Memorandum No. 6
Provides detailed technical information on different brickmaking techniques and covers all processing stages, including quarrying, clay preparation, moulding, drying, firing and the testing of produced bricks. The techniques described are mostly of interest to small-scale producers in both rural and urban areas. The processes and equipment are described in great detail, including drawings of equipment and tools which may be produced locally, floor plans, labour and skill requirements, materials and fuel inputs per unit of output. A list of equipment suppliers from both developing and developed countries is also supplied with a view to assisting the would-be brickmaker to import the required equipment. A chapter of interest to public planners compares, from a socio-economic point of view, the various brickmaking techniques described in this memorandum.

ISBN 92-2-103567-0

27.50 Swiss francs

Small-scale paper-making. Technology Series, Technical Memorandum No. 8

Provides technical and economic information on alternative paper-making technologies, describes the characteristics of various types and grades of paper products and gives guidance in the choice of paper machines. The information relates mostly to small-scale paper mills with a capacity of 30 tonnes of paper per day or less. The raw materials suggested for such mills include straw, bagasse, waste paper, rags and cotton waste, as well as other agricultural residues and imported wood pulp. Unlike other memoranda in the series, this memorandum is not a technical introduction to paper-making in general, nor is it a basic textbook on the subject. Instead, it provides people already in possession of the necessary background knowledge with criteria for choosing amongst different methods of paper-making.

ISBN 92-2-103971-4

22.50 Swiss francs

Small-scale manufacture of stabilised soil blocks. Technology Series, Technical Memorandum No. 12

This memorandum provides technical and economic information on alternative technologies for the production of stabilised soil blocks. The information provided relates mostly to small-scale units producing up to 400 blocks per day. It covers all aspects of block making: the quarrying and testing of raw materials; the choice of soil stabilisers; pre-processing operations (grinding, sieving, proportioning and mixing); block-forming methods, including a detailed description of machines currently available for making soil blocks; the curing and testing of produced blocks; and the use of mortars and renderings in wall construction.

The first and last chapters, which are on the technical and economic efficiency of stabilised soil blocks in comparison with other building materials, will mostly be of interest to public planners and housing authorities. The subjects covered include production costs, employment generation, foreign exchange savings and housing maintenance costs. The last chapter also gives some guidelines for government action in support of the use of earth as a building material.

ISBN 92-2-105838-7

20 Swiss francs

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