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CLOSE THIS BOOKForming Techniques for the Self-Reliant Potter (GTZ, 1991, 194 p.)
VIEW THE DOCUMENT(introduction...)
VIEW THE DOCUMENTAcknowledgements
VIEW THE DOCUMENT1. Introduction and scope
2. Products and options
3. Main product lines and forming options
4. Plastic clay forming
5. Semidry foaming
6. Mouldmaking and Plaster of Paris
7. Slip casting
8. Finishing and quality control
9. Drying of ware and moulds
10. Work flow and factory layout
VIEW THE DOCUMENTGlossary
VIEW THE DOCUMENTTables of weights and measures
VIEW THE DOCUMENTTable of sieve mesh sizes
VIEW THE DOCUMENTDensity
VIEW THE DOCUMENTTwaddell scale
VIEW THE DOCUMENTDry content of liquid
VIEW THE DOCUMENTPint weights
VIEW THE DOCUMENTBibliography

1. Introduction and scope

This book is intended as a practical guide for cottage and small-scale ceramics production, primarily in developing countries, using locally-based technology and available raw materials, where machinery usually needs to be made locally in order to be practical. However, we think it may also be of use in developed countries, as many “studio” potters are shifting from one-person production to a group approach, creating interest in the revival of jiggers, handmade tiles, etc.

It is assumed that the reader is already producing ceramics, or is looking into the possibility of starting ceramics as a business.

Much of the material is based on the direct experience of the authors in developing countries, in particular Nepal, Burma, Tanzania, India, Bangladesh and Thailand, where we both have been involved for several years in ceramics development projects, and have looked closely at the various problems and solutions, past and present. Information about forming systems and machinery designs is for the most part not available in books. Nor has there been much documentation of successful systems that small factories use in developing countries. We hope that this book will help to fill the gap.

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