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CLOSE THIS BOOKSoil and Water Conservation (SWC) Technologies and Agroforestry Systems (IIRR, 1992, 171 p.)
VIEW THE DOCUMENTMessage
VIEW THE DOCUMENTWorkshop to revise
VIEW THE DOCUMENTList of participants
VIEW THE DOCUMENTCurrent program thrusts in Upland development
VIEW THE DOCUMENTDegradation of the uplands
VIEW THE DOCUMENTNutrient cycles in upland farms
VIEW THE DOCUMENTEstablishing an swcsystem
VIEW THE DOCUMENTFarm management practices that reinforce SWC
VIEW THE DOCUMENTTraditional soil and water conservation (SWC) technologies
Options for contour farming:
VIEW THE DOCUMENTLand management practices for improved water conservation
VIEW THE DOCUMENTIn-row tillage
VIEW THE DOCUMENTMaking an A-frame
VIEW THE DOCUMENTControlling Cogon and Talahib
VIEW THE DOCUMENTUse of derris as botanical pesticide
VIEW THE DOCUMENTFire control in the uplands
VIEW THE DOCUMENTCultural management of pest infestation
Organic fertilizer sources:
VIEW THE DOCUMENTBiofertilizers
VIEW THE DOCUMENTSelection of cover crops
VIEW THE DOCUMENTBatao in the upland. Cropping system
VIEW THE DOCUMENTIncreasing the woody contents in leaf litter
Examples of indigenous agroforestry systems:

Message

Agroforestry, the land management system of incorporating crop production with tree and/or livestock production, evolved to become one of the most widely promoted tools for sustaining development in the uplands To supplement the materials used by upland development extension workers in promoting agroforestry, a group of specialists, technicians and farmers from 11 government and nongovemment organizations met at the invitation of the International Institute of Rural Reconstruction in Silang, Cavite in November 1989 to develop the Agroforestry Technology Information Kit (ATIK). In November 1992, some of the specialists, together with some farmers and an additional number of specialists and technicians, met again at IIRR to revise the ATIK.

The updated kit is handy, easy-to-understand and full of illustrations. It widely uses indigenous technologies. With this kit, it is hoped that extension workers and upland dwellers develop a better understanding and appreciation of agroforestry. The success of agroforestry as a tool for sustaining upland development, however, will depend on how this tool is introduced and implemented. Sustainable agroforestry systems can only be attained if upland dwellers are involved in the planning and establishment of such systems.

I commend all those involved in the production of this useful kit.

Angel C. Alcala Secretary Department of Environment and Natural Resources

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