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CLOSE THIS BOOKBetter Farming Series 03 - The Plant: the Flower (FAO - INADES, 1976, 29 p.)
The fruit and the seed
VIEW THE DOCUMENT(introduction...)
VIEW THE DOCUMENTMango
VIEW THE DOCUMENTPapaya
VIEW THE DOCUMENTGroundnut
VIEW THE DOCUMENTRice
VIEW THE DOCUMENTSummary

Better Farming Series 03 - The Plant: the Flower (FAO - INADES, 1976, 29 p.)

The fruit and the seed

Plants are not all alike, Roots, stems, leaves, flowers are different. The fruits too are different.

The mango, cocoa pod, grains of maize, the avocado, papaya and cotton boll are all fruits. But they are not alike.

Mango


Mango

The fruit of the mango is covered with a hard skin.

The flesh is underneath this skin. It comes from the ovary of the flower. It is yellow, juicy, good to eat. It covers the seed.

The seed is big and hard. It comes from the ovule of the flower. It contains a germ.

In the ground the germ can produce a mango tree.

Papaya


Papaya cut in half

The fruit of the papaya tree is covered with a very thin skin.
The flesh is underneath this skin. It is yellow, juicy, good to eat. It covers very many seeds. Each seed contains a germ. In the ground the germ can produce a papaya tree.

Groundnut


Ground nut

The fruit of the groundnut is covered with a shell. This shell is yellow; it dries when taken out of the ground.

It covers one or more seeds. Each seed contains a germ. In the ground the germ can produce a groundnut plant.

Rice


Rice

Each grain of rice is a fruit.
The fruit of rice consists of two parts: the seed and fine, dry husks.
Each grain contains a germ. In the ground the germ can produce a rice plant.

Summary

The flesh of the papaya and the mango, the shell of the groundnut and the husk of rice contain one or more seeds.
All fruits consist of a covering containing one or more seeds.
We eat or sow only the seeds and not the coverings of millet, groundnuts, cotton or rice.
Removing the coverings of millet or sorghum is called threshing.
Removing the covering of cotton is called ginning.
Removing the covering of groundnuts is called shelling.
Removing the covering of rice is called husking.
Threshing, ginning, shelling or husking can be done by hand in the traditional way or by machine.
For instance, there are ginning mills for cotton.
We shall have more to say on this in the courses on particular crops.

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